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  • It is always an excitement to enter into Silver Lake Preserve. With such diverse habitats and wide array of wildlife, Silver Lake Bog Preserve is not one to be missed.
  • Boardwalks wind through the preserve. They allow people to get up close to nature without disturbing it. Silver Lake Bog Preserve is so thick at times that it feels as if one is walking through a jungle.
  • The boardwalks in the preserve are especially useful teaching tools for children. Here, a young girl examines an intriguing carnivorous pitcher plant.
  • This white-throated sparrow is primarily a winter visitor and a migrant. It has a beautiful song in the day and a silvery flocking call that rings throughout the expanse of Silver Lake Bog Preserve when evening comes.
  • Lichens grow on countless trees throughout the preserve. Composed of a symbiotic association of a fungus and a photosynthetic partner, lichens are small but fascinating examples of the many nature’s wonders throughout Silver Lake Bog Preserve.
  • The snowshoe hare is one of the smallest and shiest of the hares. The hare’s coat actually changes color in winter and summer as a response to the varying amount of sunlight; in winter, it is white for camouflage in the snow, and in the summer, it is brown.
  • Many small bodies of water can be seen throughout the preserve. These are great for harboring all sorts of wildlife but also add to the aesthetic component.
  • The spring peeper is one of the most familiar frogs in the East. Its chorus on spring nights is difficult not to hear, but the frog itself is difficult to see. It gets its name from the exact sound it makes – a high-pitched ‘peep.’
New York
Adirondacks: Silver Lake Bog Preserve

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