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  • "I used a vintage dress given to me by a friend; plants that I collected at the Conservancy’s Santa Fe Canyon Preserve; and dried flowers from the Santa Fe Farmers Market. Creating a fairy that personified the spirit of the land seemed like a perfect fit for this project." - Nancy Judd, Artist
  • "With the use of medical scanning and imaging technologies...we scanned a fully packed picnic basket. The renderings in the four panels are built using transparency layers that start with the densest object." - Devendra Contractor & Kenji Kondo, Artists
  • Stones from my yard have swollen felted crimson wool coverings referencing the lush ripeness of seeds, fruit and motherhood. Bone china fish entangled among lengths of woolen yarn and knots of cotton twine evoke struggle, migration and instinct. - Yuki Murata, Artist
  • This is a collaboration between mother and daughter. The vintage Japanese handmade papers were used as found or stained with a traditional form of persimmon tannin harvested from unripe persimmons. - Sialia and Gail Rieke, Artists
  • "I think artists are like scientists, they come up with a premise, then try to prove it. When I was given the picnic basket, the challenge was how to make it more than what it was and also to incorporate my vision of animals made from recycled and found material." - Geoffrey Gorman, Artist
  • "I work intuitively, painting an abstract painting before applying bits and pieces of photographic fragments on the surface. By processing the world through my eyes and my hands, I am able to make some greater sense of...the world around me." - Holly Roberts, Artist
  • "The concept...is based on the 19th century New Mexican tin trinket known as a baulito, boxes made to hold important papers. The colors also relate to various New Mexico sky atmospheres at times – blues going green to gray when we are fortunate enough to have rain." - Lane and Amelia Coulter, Jan Brooks, Artists
  • Una Pinic Cesta para El Dia de los Muertos "I want the clay to “stand forth” recognized for what it is while it also conveys other realities." - Joe Bova, Artist
  • "My compositions emerge from my desire to describe the nature of creativity and, as I see it, the architecture of the soul. My work always begins with paper, so for me, the "picnic basket" immediately became the "take out box" I used to enjoy while studying in New York." - Kevin Box, Artist
  • "An old fashioned children's poem popped into my head, "A TISKET A TASKET a green and yellow basket..." In keeping with the "lost letter" from the poem, don't forget there's the love letter hidden at the bottom of the basket!" - Laurie Archer, Artist

  • "I carefully and slowly disassembled it, sorting it into its most basic parts. I’ve taken the most compelling of these basic forms, the thin oak ovoid weaving strips, to work with to compose a work of visual art." - Matthew Chase-Daniel, Artist
  • "Nature is primed to tell us intriguing, unimaginable and useful secrets. My work continually explores the humanity found in nature." - Chris Richter, Artist
  • "[My process] is how I imagine birds might collect, place, and assemble their nests, very intuitively using materials found in their environment. By choosing to work with the color white, I wanted to set a symbolic subtext of simplicity and purity." - Maude Andrade, Artist
  • "My style evolved in the struggle of push and pull between artist and canvas, in the space of my own private, quirky, little battleground of observation, interpretation, intention and application." - Melinda K. Hall, Artist
  • "I was raised in the Southwest near the foothills of our desert mountains and have a passion for the harsh, rugged spaces among huge skies. I wanted to photograph the spaces I love and started a series over ten years ago and have continued since." - Peter Ogilivie, Artist
The Nature Conservancy in New Mexico
"Picnic for Earth" Art Exhibition at Patina Gallery
Santa Fe, New Mexico

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