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Forest to Faucet

Resources for Teachers and Students


Where does your water comes from?

A simple question - but how many people know the answer?  We took to the streets to find out.

Watch

Nature and Clean Water:  It's Elementary

A third-grader uses a homemade science project to show how nature provides clean water to people.

Watch

Show Us Your H2O!

Schools and community groups across Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Morris, and Somerset Counties were invited to submit entries for our Show Us Your H2O contest that explored and illustrated where their water sources for everyday drinking, bathing, cooking, and gardening come from. Human actions have a huge impact on water quality and quantity, yet most people have little understanding of where their water comes from or how their actions affect water.

Contest participants learned how critical it is to focus on freshwater conservation practices, especially as urban populations grow and the demand for water increases, because:

  • Fresh water is one of the most crucial natural resources for humanity, yet freshwater ecosystems are severely under-protected and under-represented in the global network of protected areas.
  • Many scientific studies have concluded that well-protected watersheds provide better quality water supplies. Better water quality means lower treatment costs to serve people's needs.
  • The actions of individuals like you can make a difference in conserving our water resources.

The selected winners each had a rain garden designed and installed on their properties as an on-going educational tool as well as a way to help infiltrate stormwater naturally and divert it from neighborhood streams. Rain gardens are designed to temporarily hold and soak up rainwater runoff and help to improve water quality in nearby bodies of water - they can cut down on the amount of pollution reaching creeks and streams by up to 30%. The contest and rain garden installations helped students and community members understand the value of using nature based solutions to address water related problems such as flooding, erosion, and water quality.

One rain garden was installed at Bernards High School in Bernardsville, New Jersey, and the second one was installed at the Southern Boulevard Elementary School on behalf of the Civic Group Category winner, Chatham Township Environmental Commission. Over the summer and fall, we had fun planning and designing the gardens with partners such as The Bernards High Green Team, Southern Boulevard Garden Committee, and The Great Swamp Watershed Association.

  • Plant Your Own Rain Garden! Make a difference in your community and improve local water quality by building a rain garden. Click here to learn how.
Partnership with Johnson and Johnson

The contest is part of a freshwater awareness campaign launched in partnership with Johnson & Johnson in order to educate students, teachers and the general public about the need to protect freshwater resources.

What is the Forest to Faucet Program?

Forest to Faucet is an educational program designed to help kids make the connection between forests and our freshwater resources, ensuring that the clean water we need to survive flows from our taps. 

The growing demand for clean drinking water, arable land and living space is placing unprecedented stress on our natural resources, including the fresh water we need to survive.

Human actions have a huge impact on water quality and quantity, yet most people have little understanding of where their water comes from or how their actions affect water. This lack of awareness is a big problem when scientists are predicting that by 2025 more than two-thirds of the world’s population could face water shortages.

The Forest to Faucet Program offers teachers the tools they need to educate their students about water conservation.  We offer lesson plans and other resources to help kids get outside and test their water quality.

 

  • If you are an educator and would like to learn more about the Program click here
  • If you are a student and want to know how you can take action to protect your water click here.
Forests and our Faucets – What’s the Connection?

Forests are the first step in keeping our water clean and pollution-free. Our forests are “living filters” that provide us with clean water by intercepting and absorbing sediment, excess nutrients and pollutants.  Trees also help store water and release it slowly over time, enhancing water quantity. 

Most of the world’s population lives downstream of forested watersheds and, of the 100 largest cities, more than 40 percent rely on runoff from protected areas.

It is critical that we focus on freshwater conservation practices, especially as urban populations grow and the demand for water increases, because:

  • Fresh water is one of the most crucial natural resources for humanity, yet freshwater ecosystems are severely under-protected and under-represented in the global network of protected areas.
  • Many scientific studies have concluded that well-protected watersheds provide better quality water supplies. Better water quality means lower treatment costs to serve people's needs.
  • The actions of individuals like you can make a difference in conserving our water resources.

     

 

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