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Faces of Conservation

Thomas Caulfield

“I chose to do the project that I did because it was the first project [with the Boy Scouts] on the Sweet Trail and my troop likes to build connections with different areas so that they can do many projects there."

The path from Longmarsh Road to Great Bay just got a little sweeter thanks to Thomas Caulfield.  A 17 year-old senior at Oyster River High School in Durham, Thomas enjoys running and track. He has also been a Boy Scout since Kindergarten, with this year marking the achievement of becoming an Eagle Scout. A requirement to earn the title is to champion a volunteer project for another organization. “A big part of becoming an Eagle Scout is building and showing your leadership skills,” says Thomas. “This is why you have to do a project, in order to use your leadership skills.” 

Thomas worked with the Great Bay Resource Protection Partnership (GBRPP) to design and create wooden trail signs to be placed along the 4.2-mile Sweet Trail from Durham to Newmarket. “I chose to do the project that I did because it was the first project [with the Boy Scouts] on the Sweet Trail and my troop likes to build connections with different areas so that they can do many projects there,” notes Thomas. “Making trail signs seemed like an interesting thing to do. I have walked the Sweet Trail and noticed that signs could be very helpful.” Thomas’ signs appear at junctions along the trail, providing clear guidance for hikers as they make their way to the Bay.

“The Sweet Trail is unique as it is a one-way trail to the Bay and not a loop trail as a hiker might expect,” remarks Joanne Glode, Southern New Hampshire Stewardship Ecologist for The Nature Conservancy, a GBRPP partner organization.  “As such, we’d heard some stories of hikers getting disoriented along its path.  The Great Bay Resource Protection Partnership presented this problem to Thomas and asked him to come up with some signage to help convey this message from the 3 major trailheads that link into the 4.2-mile trail.  We are impressed with the signs he created and are very appreciative of Thomas’ quality work.”  

College plans are next up for Thomas. Though interested in environmental science, he hopes to study engineering. No doubt his dedication to the Boy Scouts and to his community will translate well to higher learning. Congratulations and thank you, Thomas!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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