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It's the season of giving back and giving thanks.  Writer Jill Wells talks to John Ragsdale, a volunteer and member from Lincoln about what motivates him to be part of The Nature Conservancy.

Jill:

Why do you give to The Nature Conservancy?

John:

I share The Nature Conservancy’s belief that efforts to preserve and conserve nature require positive, results-oriented actions and non-confrontational, pragmatic approaches work best. In particular, I value the Conservancy’s appreciation of the fact that stakeholders do not generally act against their economic self-interest, conservation successes involve the cooperation of and collaboration with those stakeholders and overcoming threats to nature often requires control, if not ownership, of the resource threatened.

Jill:

What are some of your favorite places in nature?

John:

Rocky Mountain National Park and the Great Sand Dunes National Park are favorites. In Nebraska, it's the Niobrara Valley Preserve and the Sandhills.

Jill:

Tell me about your favorite memory or experience in nature.

John:

Two come to mind: the arrival of sandhills cranes at the Platte River for overnight roosting, and prairie chicken and sharp-tail grouse booming on leks. Both left me in awe.

Jill:

What is your holiday wish for nature?

John:

That more people experience nature’s beauty and thereby develop an awareness and understanding of why preservation of nature is imperative.


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