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  • From blooming flowers to baby bison, there's a lot that goes on in the springtime.  Sit back, relax, and enjoy this slideshow of springtime in Missouri, brought to you by The Nature Conservancy.
  • The Conservancy manages several preserves in the Ozarks, a region known for its plant and animal diversity.  Here, black cohosh (actaea racemosa) blooms at Chilton Creek Research and Demonstration Area.
  • Here, fiddlehead ferns bloom in Raymondville, Missouri.
  • Spiderwort blooming in the Missouri Ozarks.
  • The Nature Conservancy maintains a bison herd at Dunn Ranch Prairie - and springtime is when the bison welcome their newest members into the herd.
  • Last year, 17 bison were born at Dunn Ranch Prairie.
  • Along with bison, prairie chickens also call Dunn Ranch Prairie home.  The chickens' mating rituals, which take place in the spring, consist of a low, haunting booming sound and a dance.
  • Meanwhile, on the other side of Missouri, Ozark burn season is in full bloom as crews clear out the dry brush in time for spring.
  • The brush is cleared to give native plants more room and resources to grow. The fire also helps control the spread of invasive species.
  • These photos, taken at Dunn Ranch Prairie, show what the land looks like just after a controlled burn, and after some plant growth.
  • A healthy, restored prairie. Happy Spring!
Missouri
Think Spring!

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