Start receiving our award-winning magazine today!

Subscribe

Minnesota

Foxhome Prairie

Visitors come to the Foxhome Prairie Preserve to catch a glimpse of the greater prairie chicken.


Many visitors come to the Foxhome Prairie Preserve to catch a glimpse of the greater prairie chicken, when the birds' courtship ritual begins during the early spring. Another primary attraction is the small white lady's slipper, which usually grows less than a foot tall and is rarely found on Minnesota's wet prairies.

Location
Western Minnesota, Wilkin County

Size
240 acres

Why the Conservancy Selected This Site  

Foxhome Prairie is just one of several Conservancy preserves in  western and northwestern Minnesota devoted to ensuring the remaining prairie chicken population. The preserve is a small but vital link in the delicate chain of remnant northern tallgrass prairie parcels in this region of Minnesota, surrounded by agricultural land. As such, Foxhome Prairie provides an important corridor for wildlife and represents a good example of presettlement vegetation.

What the Conservancy Has Done/Is Doing
The Nature Conservancy purchased the land from Clifford Hagstrom in 1973, primarily to protect habitat for the greater prairie chicken. Because of its relatively undisturbed quality, Foxhome Prairie represents one of the few remaining parcels of northern tallgrass prairie. It also provides an educational outdoor laboratory for students and researchers from the surrounding communities.

What to See: Plants
Significant grasses include big bluestem, Indian grass, prairie dropseed and prairie cordgrass. Uncommon prairie flora like the northern gentian, Nuttall's sunflower and small white lady's slipper also thrive at Foxhome Prairie.

What to See: Animals
Although the greater prairie chicken gets the most attention, there are dozens of other bird species that inhabit the preserve. They include the marbled godwit (a species of special concern), bobolink, western meadowlark, savannah sparrow, gray catbird, and downy woodpecker. Several mammals live on the Foxhome Prairie, including the prairie deer mouse, meadow vole, masked shrew, meadow jumping mouse, striped skunk, red fox, and whitetail jackrabbit.

The diverse butterfly population adds a special touch of beauty to the preserve. Species here include the monarch, red admiral, wood nymph, orange sulphur, black swallowtail, and Poweshiek skipper (a species of special concern). Among the reptiles and amphibians at Foxhome Prairie are the great plains toad, wood frog, northern leopard frog, and the plains garter snake.

For more information on visiting this and other Minnesota preserves, check out our Preserve Visitation Guidelines.

Directions

To travel to Foxhome Prairie Preserve, drive west of Foxhome on State Highway 210 to the intersection with County Road 19. Turn north and proceed three miles north, and then turn east on a gravel road. Take this road for 1.5 miles, where Nature Conservancy signs will mark the prairie along the south side of the road. You can park on the road on the north, east, or south side of the preserve. Nearest facilities are located in Foxhome, Rothsay and Fergus Falls.

Discussion

Have you been to this preserve? Are you thinking of visiting? See what others are saying about their experiences and add your comments below.

Add Your Comments

Time for you to join the discussion. Tell us about your experience at this preserve. What plants and animals did you see? When did you go? You can help others plan their visit when you share your thoughts. And thank you for visiting one of our nature preserves!

comments powered by Disqus



Read our guidelines on posting comments




We’re Accountable

The Nature Conservancy makes careful use of your support.

More Ratings

x animal

Sign up for Nature eNews!

Sign Up for Nature e-News

Get our e-newsletter filled with eco-tips and info on the places you care about most.

Thank you for joining our online community!

We’ll be in touch soon with more Nature Conservancy news, updates and exciting stories.

Please leave this field empty

We respect your privacy. The Nature Conservancy will not sell, rent or exchange your e-mail address. Read our full privacy policy for more information. By submitting this form, you agree to the Nature.org terms of use.