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Join The Nature Conservancy for “7 Billion and Counting: Population and the Planet,” the First Event in This Year’s Future of Nature Speakers’ Series

On April 28, a panel of leading thinkers will tackle the question of whether population growth must harm nature and its ability to sustain life.


BOSTON | March 18, 2014

Glance at any rapidly ticking global population counter, and it’s clear. Global population growth must be part of the conversation about sustaining the planet.

Already more than 7 billion, Earth’s human population is projected to exceed 9 billion people by 2050.

Does human population growth affect other species and the planet as a whole? What about families already struggling to find food, water and healthcare? Can empowering women make life more sustainable for people and nature? Can conservation and technology innovations support Earth's ability to provide food, water and other benefits for 7 billion people and counting?

Join The Nature Conservancy and a panel of thought leaders on population and the environment as they tackle these questions and more in this important community conversation at “7 Billion and Counting: Population and the Planet,” the first of three events in the second annual Future of Nature lecture series. Tickets can be purchased at nature.org/future.

7 Billion and Counting: Population and the Planet

Monday, April 28, 5:30 p.m.-8 p.m. (Reception starts at 5:30 p.m.; discussion at 6:30 p.m.) Calderwood Pavilion at the Boston Center for the Arts, Wimberly Theatre, 527 Tremont Street, Boston

Panelists include:

  • Caroline Crosbie, senior vice president, Pathfinder International.
  • Roger-Mark De Souza, director of Population, Environmental Security, and Resilience, Wilson Center.
  • Peter Kareiva, chief scientist and director of science, The Nature Conservancy.
  • Alan Weisman, journalist and author of “The World without Us” and “Countdown.”

Each night of The Future of Nature will feature leaders in their fields discussing some of our most critical conservation challenges and opportunities. “7 Billion and Counting: Population and the Planet,” will be followed by two events:

  • May 12, “Investing in Nature: Conservation and the Bottom Line,” a discussion of the relationship between environmentally responsible investment and a strong economy.
  • June 9, “Weathering the Storm: Boston’s Future Climate,” a discussion of how Boston can prepare for the impacts of a changing climate.

Each night will include a pre-event reception with refreshments, conversation, and information from community groups working on these important issues.

All events will be at the Calderwood Pavilion at the Boston Center for the Arts.

Tickets are $25 per event. A series pass for all three events is $60.

Individual event tickets and series passes can be purchased online via nature.org/future.

Tickets will not be sold at the door.

You can also join the conversation by tweeting your hopes and concerns, using the hashtag #futureofnature. What does the future of nature look like? Follow what your neighbors have to say at @Nature_NE.
 


The Nature Conservancy is a leading conservation organization working around the world to conserve the lands and waters on which all life depends. The Conservancy and its more than 1 million members have protected nearly 120 million acres worldwide. Visit The Nature Conservancy on the Web at www.nature.org

Contact information

James Miller
Senior Media Relations Manager
The Nature Conservancy in Massachusetts
617-532-8339 (desk), 857-600-6603 (cell)
james_miller@tnc.org

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