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  • Jeff Kneebone, a marine biologist with the Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries, releases a freshly-tagged Atlantic cod into Massachusetts Bay.
  • A commercial trawler motors across Massachusetts Bay. Cod and other groundfish species have been declining in numbers for decades throughout the Gulf of Maine.
  • Technicians implant an acoustic tag into a cod aboard a commercial fishing trawler in Massachusetts Bay. The data will help scientists and policy-makers restore cod numbers.
  • Fisheries researchers keep track of each cod tagged so that they can provide valuable data about fish movement and use of habitat.
  • Jeff Kneebone (left), from the Mass. Division of Marine Fisheries contractor, and The Nature Conservancy's Chris McGuire, right, discuss cod findings during a research trip to tag and study cod aboard the "Yankee Rose."
  • The acoustic tags are not much bigger than lipstick and don't harm the cod.
  • A tagged cod swims in a holding tank aboard the commercial fishing boat "Endeavor" shortly before the fish's release into the waters off Scituate, Massachusetts.
  • Ten miles off the coast, the Boston skyline looms in the sunset. Once a strong part of the Massachusetts coastal economy, restoring cod and other groundfish in the Gulf of Maine may yield many benefits.
Cod-Tagging Slideshow
Photographer John Clarke Russ captures amazing' images of this remarkable research off the coast of Scituate, Massachusetts.

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