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The Nature Conservancy in Maryland/DC

Maryland/DC Bird Walks

Avid birder and environmental educator, Wendy Paulson leads an early morning bird spotting tour of Theodore Roosevelt Island. © Mark Godfrey/TNC

Birders check out the trees on a previous bird walk to Theodore Roosevelt Island, which is situated in the Potomac River in Virginia. © Mark Godfrey/TNC

The turkey vulture's (Cathartes aura) bad habits and homely features match its unflattering nickname: nature's garbage disposal. However, it is this characteristic that makes them so essential to the food chain. © Alan Eckert Photography

Yellow-rumped warblers (Dendroica coronata) are affectionately known to birders as butter butts. © Dave Spier

The Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) is one of the most colorful birds to nest in our backyards and to visit our feeders. Considered by some to be a bully at the bird feeder, most birdwatchers welcome this beautiful blue and white bird to their yards. © Connie Gelb/TNC

A female Downy Woodpecker (Picoides pubescens) is one of five different types of woodpeckers you night see on Theodore Roosevelt Island. The only difference between a Downy and a Hairy Woodpecker is the size of its beak. © Janet Haas

Green heron (Butorides virescens) can often be seen catching fish along the sides of the canal. © Dennis Bingaman

The Red-bellied woodpecker (Melanerpes carolinus) does not actually have a very red belly so don't let names deceive you! © Janet Haas

The Double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) can be found not only in the US but also in the Yangtze River in China. © Dave Spier

Barn swallows (Hirundo rustica) are extremely hard to identify as they are found swooping over lakes and rivers. © Bob Stocke. This is the end of the slide show. Please hit the Next arrow to view the show again.

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