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Louisiana

The Atchafalaya River Basin History and Ecology of an American Wetland

A benchmark study of one of America's most important wetland ecosystems

For more than five centuries, the Atchafalaya River Basin has captured the flow of the Mississippi River, becoming its main distributary as it reaches the Gulf of Mexico in South Louisiana. This dynamic environment, comprising almost a million acres of the lower Mississippi Aluvial Vallley and Mississippi River Deltaic Plain, is perhaps best known for its expansive swamp environments dominated by bald cypress, water tupelo, and alligators. But the Atchafalaya River Basin contains a wide range of habitats and one of the highest levels of biodiversity on the North American Continent.

Reviewers of the book gave the following endorsements:

"A thorough and thought-provoking compilation of facts on America's most important river basin swamp. The book is a handy reference for the scientist and nature enthusiast alike. The tables and graphs make it easy reading and user friendly." - C. C. Lockwood

"This intricate work penetrates every backwater, stillwater, and channel of the Atchafalaya Basin, so massaged by the hand of man and the endurance of nature. Piazza manages to dissect with a deft hand that will leave you aghast at his knowledge of the regions biology, geology, history, and magic - as well as to warn of its fragility." - Christopher Hallowell

Texas A&M University Press


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