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How We Work

Science & Stewardship

The Nature Conservancy uses a systematic, science-based approach to identifying sites for protection called Conservation by Design, our framework for achieving mission success. It focuses on the protection of entire landscapes and the plants and animals they support. Learn more about our ecoregional planning, conservation strategies and methods.

In 1998, Hawai'i was one of the first Conservancy chapters to draft an ecoregional plan. In 2006, we unveiled our second iteration plan: the first entirely web-mediated ecoregional assessment. The plan is a dynamic educational resource as well as a concise sharing of our priorities and strategies.

More recently, Conservancy scientists completed an assessment of the near-shore waters surrounding the eight main Hawaiian Islands. They study identified key prioities for long-term conservation, including important turtle-nesting beaches, sea-grass beds, intact coral reefs and pupping sites for the endangered Hawaiian monk seal. With input from more than 80 of state's top marine experts, the study has become the guiding framework for increasing the scope and pace of marine conservation in Hawai'i. 

 Key Conservation Issues
 Culture and Kuleana

Hawaii's vibrant culture is closely linked with its rich natural heritage. Nature is celebrated in chant, song and dance and Hawaiian cultural traditions and values, such as kuleana, a deep sense of personal responsibility, reflect this close relationship with the islands' landscapes, native species and ecological processes.The culture of Hawai'i cannot survive without the land and natural resources from which these traditions evolved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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