Start receiving our award-winning magazine today!

Subscribe
  • Reshaping a stream: Photo showing approximately 0.5 miles of completed new channel construction within the former pool of the Kelley Branch impoundment. Channel reconstruction was necessary due to channelization of this stretch and to assure proper fluvial dynamics and connectivity. Photo © Michael Hill/Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.
  • Map of preserve showing Kelley Branch Dam. Map © TNC
  • 1980 aerial photo of Kelley Branch Dam. Map © TNC
  • Aerial photo of Kelley Branch showing channelization by previous land owner after drawing down of the pool. This stretch was channelized when the pond was constructed in the mid-1950s presumably in order to more easily clear trees from the pool area within the impoundment. Photo © Michael Hill/Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
  • Culvert outflow located below the dam at Kelley Branch. Culvert is undersized and perched, resulting in downstream entrenchment, bank erosion and instability, and loss of in-stream connectivity. Photo © Steven J. Herrington/TNC
  • Construction of new stream channel by C.K. Arrington and Associates (contractor) in the former pool of the Kelley Branch impoundment. Workers are installing coir fiber matting to stream banks to provide stabilization for vegetation growth and to prevent sedimentation and bank failure. Photo © Michael Hill/Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
  • Aerial photo showing entire Kelley Branch impoundment area and completed dam removal and stream channel rehabilitation. © Michael Hill/Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
  • Upstream view of newly completed construction of stream channel at Kelley Branch with coir fiber matting to stabilize stream banks. A mixture of an annual cover crop and perennial seed mixture of naturally occurring plants was seeded to help provide vegetation growth and stabilization. July 24, 2007 Photo © Steven J. Herrington/TNC
  • Upstream view of completed construction of stream channel at Kelley Branch showing vegetation growth and colonization. April 22, 2008 Photo © Steven J. Herrington/TNC
  • A year later: Upstream view of completed construction of stream channel at Kelley Branch showing vegetation growth and colonization approximately one year after project completion. July 27, 2008 Photo © Steven J. Herrington/TNC
  • The American eel spends most of its life in freshwater before migrating to the Atlantic Ocean to spawn. Populations of this species have severely declined primarily as a result of damming. Previously found only below the dam, this species is now present throughout Kelley Branch. Photo © Steven J. Herrington/TNC
  • Prior to the removal of the dam, the lake chubsucker was the most common fish captured at Kelley Branch. An inhabitor of lakes and other waters with little current, the chubsucker is now rarely captured at Kelley Branch — an indicator that the stream is restored to its natural state. Photo © Steven J. Herrington/TNC
  • Clear, cool streams that emanate from Steephead ravines provide a unique microclimate that creates a suitable environment for rare and endangered plants and animals like the Say’s spiketail dragonfly nymph. Photo © Steven J. Herrington/TNC
  • The Conservancy works closely with local, state, and federal partners to collaborate on this and other restoration projects in high-priority streams and rivers in Florida, Alabama and Georgia. Photo © Steven J. Herrington/TNC
Florida
Kelley Branch Dam Removal

We’re Accountable

The Nature Conservancy makes careful use of your support.

More Ratings

x animal

Sign up for Nature eNews!

Sign Up for Nature e-News

Get our e-newsletter filled with eco-tips and info on the places you care about most.

Thank you for joining our online community!

We’ll be in touch soon with more Nature Conservancy news, updates and exciting stories.

Please leave this field empty

We respect your privacy. The Nature Conservancy will not sell, rent or exchange your e-mail address. Read our full privacy policy for more information. By submitting this form, you agree to the Nature.org terms of use.