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Learn about Ed Bills Pond Dam Removal at a Public Information Session July 15 in Lyme

The meeting is an opportunity for residents to learn about this river restoration project and discuss concerns about potential impacts to historic resources near it.


LYME, CT | June 24, 2013

The Eightmile River Wild & Scenic Coordinating Committee and the Lyme Land Conservation Trust invite the public to an informational meeting about the Ed Bills Pond Dam removal and East Branch Eightmile River restoration project. The meeting will be held Monday, July 15 from 7 p.m.-9 p.m. at the Lyme Public Hall at 249 Hamburg Road.

Representatives from The Nature Conservancy and American Rivers will be joined by project design engineers and project partners to present an overview. The meeting is an opportunity for residents to learn about this river restoration project and discuss concerns about potential impacts to historic resources.

The Ed Bills Pond Dam is near the beginning of the East Branch of the Eightmile River on Salem Road. It’s the only remaining dam on the East Branch. This project will remove the dam and existing fish ladder in order to restore unrestricted natural river conditions through the area flooded by the dam, resulting in 9.7 miles of free flowing river.

The dam is privately owned, and the dam owner is working closely with local and regional project partners to advance river restoration. Partners include The Nature Conservancy, American Rivers and the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection’s Inland Fisheries Division. The Eightmile Wild & Scenic Coordinating Committee and the Lyme Land Trust are hosting the public information meeting.

Dam removal will restore the natural river hydrology and provide habitat for species such as brook trout and sculpin, as well as such migratory species as alewife, salmon, eel and lamprey.
 


The Nature Conservancy is a leading conservation organization working around the world to conserve the lands and waters on which all life depends. The Conservancy and its more than 1 million members have protected nearly 120 million acres worldwide. Visit The Nature Conservancy on the Web at www.nature.org

Contact information

James Miller
Media Relations Manager
(857) 600-6603
james_miller@tnc.org

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