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Join the Source to Sea Cleanup and Help Protect the Connecticut River System, One of Our Great Natural Treasures

Events take place October 4 and 5.


OLD SAYBROOK AND WETHERSFIELD, CT  | September 19, 2013

Have you walked along a river or stream bank recently and found discarded cans, plastic bottles, fast food containers or other trash spoiling a beautiful natural place?

The Connecticut River Watershed Council (CRWC) invites you take action this October by joining thousands of other volunteers across New England in the 17th annual Source to Sea Cleanup of the Connecticut River system—rivers and streams and their banks, as well as parks, boat launches, trails and more.

The Source to Sea Cleanup will take place on Friday, Oct. 4 and Saturday, Oct. 5. You can join by visiting the CRWC on the web at www.ctriver.org. At the website, you can also report trash sites in need of cleaning up. You can report trash sites anytime, year-round. Please do!

The Nature Conservancy, a partner in the Source to Sea Cleanup, offers these opportunities to get involved:

  • Oct. 4, Old Saybrook—Join the Conservancy and a crew of volunteers to clean Ragged Rock Creek Preserve, which is owned by the Conservancy and the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection.
     
  • Oct. 5, Wethersfield —Additional volunteers are welcome to join the Conservancy and The Metropolitan District (MDC) to clean up the Wethersfield Cove.

These sites were selected primarily because of their significance to the health of the Connecticut River and Long Island Sound, said David Gumbart, assistant director of land management for the Conservancy in Connecticut.

“At Ragged Rock Creek Preserve, a salt marsh on the west side of the Connecticut River where the river meets Long Island Sound, the storm surge from Hurricane Sandy moved a significant amount of debris westerly onto the marsh,” Gumbart said. “Wethersfield Cove, also known as Folly Brook, is a tidally influenced floodplain forest on the west side of the Connecticut River, immediately south of the City of Hartford. This site is an ecological gem hidden beside major highways, an airport and a city.”

Volunteers can get involved in the Conservancy’s cleanup efforts by contacting Cynthia Fowx at theden@tnc.org or 203-226-4991. To volunteer at the Wethersfield Cove clean up on Oct. 5th, please contact Julie McLaughlin at 860-278-7850 ext. 3309 or jmclaughlin@themdc.com.

Registration is also open for other 2013 Source to Sea Cleanup events.

All are welcome. Individuals can work solo, start a group, or join a group by visiting www.ctriver.org.

“Source to Sea Cleanup volunteers have worked hard to combat litter and illegally dumped trash,” said Jacqueline Talbot, River Steward and organizer of the Cleanup. “In the past 16 years, our volunteers have prevented over 806 tons of trash from continuing to pollute the Connecticut River and its tributaries.”

“But the trash keeps showing up. Removing it helps keep precious water resources clean and our natural spaces safe for families and wildlife. It’s a big watershed, so we rely on people to let us know about the problem spots,” Talbot said. “We may not be able to get to all of them this year, but we’ll work with local residents and agencies to get to as many as possible.”

Anyone who has a trash tip should contact CRWC at www.ctriver.org or by calling 860-704-0057.

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The Connecticut River Watershed Council has been a non-profit advocate for the 11,000 square-mile watershed of the Connecticut River since 1952 and is proud to celebrate 60 years of hard work for the river in 2013.

The MDC is a nonprofit municipal corporation chartered by the Connecticut General Assembly in 1929. The MDC provides water, sewer and household hazardous waste collection services to its member municipalities: Bloomfield, East Hartford, Hartford, Newington, Rocky Hill, West Hartford, Wethersfield and Windsor.


The Nature Conservancy is a leading conservation organization working around the world to conserve the lands and waters on which all life depends. The Conservancy and its more than 1 million members have protected nearly 120 million acres worldwide. Visit The Nature Conservancy on the Web at www.nature.org

Contact information

Cynthia Fowx
The Nature Conservancy in Connecticut
203-226-4991
cfowx@tnc.org


Jacqueline Talbot
Connecticut River Watershed Council
860-704-0057
jtalbot@ctriver.org


Julie McLaughlin
The Metropolitan District
860-278-7850 ext. 3309
jmclaughlin@themdc.com

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