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Long Island Sound: Three Critical Problems

$8.91 billion dollars
Estimated value of Long Island Sound to the local economy
- Long Island Sound Study

Long Island Sound is a place where kids explore the shallows with their families, sea turtles feed on crabs, and young fish dart in and out of eelgrass beds.

But the pressures on this narrow stretch of ocean sandwiched between densely populated Long Island and Connecticut are escalating every day. Revitalizing the Sound is crucial not only to preserve nature, but also to protect ourselves, our livelihoods and our way of life.

We have a choice: Our actions today will determine whether we leave our children a Long Island Sound with cleaner beaches and safer water, more seafood and a healthier economy—or a Sound crippled by clogged rivers, disappearing nursery habitats and a heavily developed coast that is poorly prepared for rising seas and stronger, more frequent storms. 

With your help, we can conserve Long Island Sound for future generations.

The Nature Conservancy has identified three urgent problems we must address now for a safe, secure and prosperous future:

  1. RISING SEAS AND STRONGER STORMS
    Preparation for major coastal storms shouldn’t just happen in the days before a storm hits; it should be an integral part of how coastal communities relate to their environment.
     
  2. DISAPPEARING SHELLFISH, SEAGRASS AND MIGRATORY FISH
    Healthy seagrass, shellfish and migratory fish are essential ingredients of a productive Long Island Sound, but all have declined dramatically.
     
  3. INCREASING PRESSURES FROM DEVELOPMENT
    Long Island Sound offers enticing opportunities for shipping, recreation and renewable energy. But every day, decisions are made without a full picture of the Sound’s important places and processes.

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