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  • Floodplain forests are beautiful places, with large trees and graceful ferns, influenced over thousands of years by periodic flooding.
  • Floodplain forest have become increasingly rare throughout the Connecticut River watershed because of conversion to agriculture and development.
  • To better understand and restore these remarkably diverse forests, the Conservancy is making a detailed assessment of the floodplain forests throughout the Connecticut River watershed.
  • Almost entirely gone from the watershed's floodplain forests are giant elms. Here's a slippery elm in the Westfield (Mass.) River watershed that survived Dutch elm disease.
  • American elms once graced many of New England's city streets until Dutch elm disease wiped them out beginning in the mid-1900s.
  • New disease-tolerant varieties of elms have been developed by the U.S. Forest Service. They should approach heights of 100 feet and live more than 100 years.
  • The Conservancy and volunteers are planting different varieties of these special elms in floodplain forests, keeping track of each elm planted.
  • Elms planted last year in the upper Connecticut River valley are doing remarkably well.
  • Volunteers, like this family in Glastonbury, Ct., are helping the Conservancy restore American elms to their former place in the Connecticut River's floodplain forests.
Restoring Elms to the Connecticut River's Floodplain Forests
With science and volunteers, the graceful tree makes a comeback.

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