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Nature Photo Contest Winners Announced

Visit Noble Street Gallery to see nature’s wonders through students' eyes.


Tucson, AZ | April 02, 2013

The Nature Conservancy in Arizona announces the winners of its first-ever high school photography contest. The contest was open to photography students attending Canyon del Oro High School in Tucson.

The winners are:

  • 1st place: Kira Hammond, senior
  • 2nd place: Timothy Gass, senior
  • 3rd place: Jacob Stockton, junior
  • Honorable Mention: Chloe Carlson, junior

The contest is an opportunity for the state’s “next generation” of conservationists to explore the outdoors through photography.

“Students were able to tap into their creativity while learning about Arizona’s beautiful landscapes and wildlife,” says Patrick Graham, the Conservancy in Arizona’s state director. “We’re hopeful they made a connection to conservation through the process and better appreciate all of the services nature provides.” 

Canyon del Oro High School is home to an outstanding photography program led by Career and Technical Instructor Lee Street. In addition to exploring many types of photography, the students learn to run a gallery while building a portfolio and preparing for the workforce. Students are required to enter a photography contest each quarter.

“This contest is great exposure for our students,” says Lee Street. “This is an opportunity for them to get published and meet other successful artists. The judges have had tremendous careers and can offer great insight for our students.”

The judges are Mark Skalny (corporate photographer), Cecil Schwalbe (long-time photographer and naturalist) and Bob Billups (Nature Conservancy photography volunteer). They focused on four criteria: composition, technical quality, creativity and relevance.

The public is invited to see the photography at Canyon del Oro High School’s Noble Street Gallery, 25 West Calle Concordia, on Wednesday, April 3 from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m.


The Nature Conservancy is a leading conservation organization working around the world to protect ecologically important lands and waters for nature and people. The Conservancy and its more than 1 million members have protected nearly 120 million acres worldwide. Visit The Nature Conservancy on the Web at www.nature.org.

Contact information

Tracey Stone
The Nature Conservancy in Arizona
602-738-1586
tstone@tnc.org

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