Orangutang

ORANGUTAN'S FOREST

It's not just a bunch of trees. It's a resource. It's air for us to breathe. It helps cool the planet. And it's home to one of the most endangered primates on Earth.
Let's protect it together.

Orangutang

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FORESTS OF BORNEO

Imagine... your family has been living among Borneo's rainforests for generations. But you don't have a voice in decisions being made about these forests. Now, imagine you are part of a team. A team with tools and connections that empower you to make decisions and take action to sustain your forests and your future.

FOREST GUARDIANS

For the Wehea community in the heart of Borneo, nature provides food, water, shelter, medicine and ceremonial resources.

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Orangutang

THE LOWDOWN ON OUR HIGH FLYING FRIENDS

Orangutans share 97% of our DNA— they are one of our closest living relatives.

More than 85% of the world’s orangutans live in Borneo (in Indonesia and Malaysia). The tropical rainforest of Borneo is the orangutan’s forest.

Orangutans require large tracts of healthy forest for survival.

Orangutans also help the forest grow. They eat lots of tree fruits and disperse their seeds as they travel.

Industrial timber, mining and the rapidly growing oil palm industry are destroying the orangutan’s forest faster than anywhere else on earth, and the orangutan’s very existence is at risk.

The Nature Conservancy is recruiting a team of forest guardians to protect the orangutan and its forest forever.

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ORANGUTANS LOVE...

Everyone loves orangutans. How could you not — they're our extended family. Even the forest loves orangutans because they help it grow. What do orangutans love?

Orangutan Partners 720x400 East Kalimantan, Indonesia © Nick Hall

The Forests of Borneo! Orangutans rely on the bounty of Borneo’s lush tropical rainforests for survival. More than 85 percent of the world’s orangutans live here.

Orangutans 720x400A young orangutan and it's mother in Kalimantan © Katie Hawk/TNC

Their families! Young orangutans nurse until they are six—males don’t leave their mothers until they are ten or so, while females stick around into their teens so they can learn about becoming mothers themselves.

Orangutans 720x400A young orangutan and it's mother in Kalimantan © Katie Hawk/TNC

Teaching! Mothers teach their young survival skills: the type and location of edible fruits and how to build nests that will shelter them as they sleep.

Orangutans 720x400 An orangutan eating fruit in Kalimantan, Indonesia © Katie Hawk/TNC

Fruit! they eat over 300 types(!) especially figs.

Orangutans 720x400An orangutan swinging through the trees in Kalimantan, Indonesia © Katie Hawk/TNC

Swinging! They swing through the tree tops on lianas (vines) where they spend most of their lives (that’s right, they are the real swingers of the rainforest).

Orangutans 720x400 A young orangutan sleeping in its mother's arms Kalimantan, Indonesia © Katie Hawk/TNC

Sleeping! They build a cozy nest for sleeping (they often build several each night to get it just right – and some incorporate what we might call a mattress, blanket and even a pillow).

Orangutan Partners 720x400Partners discuss orangutan protection in Kalimantan, Indonesia © Nick Hall

Forest Guardians! A team of communities, companies, local organizations and local and national governments working to protect the areas of the orangutan’s forest that are most critical to wildlife and people.

Orangutan 235x400Orangutan in Kalimantan, Indonesia © TNC

You! Supporters like you who make all of this work possible. Thank you and here’s a big kiss!

GUESS THE FOREST SPECIES

Who Am I? And How Can You Help Me?

Asia Forest Species Slideshow 1Guess That Animal: Forest Edition © Brian Gratwicke-Creative Commons

I have an enormous appetite and a nose for all sorts of plants. I tramp around spreading seeds, so I help propagate other species; but I’m also very difficult to protect. Who am I?

Asia Forest Species Slideshow 2Guess That Animal: Forest Edition © Brian Gratwicke-Creative Commons

The Asian Elephant—endangered. This species has been halved in recent decades due to habitat loss and poaching. Their range and diet makes them essential to conserving crucial plant species.

Asia Forest Species Slideshow 3Guess That Animal: Forest Edition © Spencer Wright-Creative Commons

I’m the biggest carnivore on the island of Borneo. You’re more likely to see me hanging from a tree than sunning on a rock—if you can spot me at all. Who am I?

Asia Forest Species Slideshow 3Guess That Animal: Forest Edition © Spencer Wright-Creative Commons

The Clouded Leopard—vulnerable. Oil palm expansion is highly threatening to the Sunda Clouded Leopard. This leopard became a separate species in 2006; we rarely see them in the wild and know little about their behavior.

Asia Forest Species Slideshow 5Guess That Animal: Forest Edition © International Rhino Foundation

I weigh in at well over 1,000 pounds and, unlike many of my relatives, I have a coat of dark red hair. I may seem like a tough individual, but I’m in danger: many people hunt me for my horns. Who am I?

Asia Forest Species Slideshow 6Guess That Animal: Forest Edition © International Rhino Foundation

Sumatran Rhino—Critically Endangered. This is the smallest rhinoceros. They’ve been decimated by human-wildlife conflict, and less than 300 still survive.

Asia Forest Species Slideshow 7Guess That Animal: Forest Edition © Gary J. Wood-Creative Commons

I’m the smallest member of my family, but that barely bothers me. I mostly eat insects, but my penchant for certain plants and fruits gets me into trouble with crop-growers. Who am I?

Asia Forest Species Slideshow 8Guess That Animal: Forest Edition © Gary J. Wood-Creative Commons

Sun Bear—Vulnerable. This species spends a lot of time in trees and can damage plantation crops. As a result, its biggest threat is humans. Help support its habitat.

Asia Forest Species Slideshow 9Guess That Animal: Forest Edition © Timmy Toucan-Creative Commons

My name makes it seem like I should be hopping around Australia, but I live right here on the island of New Guinea. In fact, this is the only place I live. Who am I?

Asia Forest Species Slideshow 10Guess That Animal: Forest Edition © Timmy Toucan-Creative Commons

Golden-Mantled Tree Kangaroo—Critically Endangered. This cute little critter is increasingly threatened by habitat loss as its forests are converted to agricultural land.

Asia Forest Species Slideshow 11Guess That Animal: Forest Edition © Doug Janson

I soar above the rainforests of Indonesia, a black-and-white streak in the sky. I’m found mostly on Java and Bali. Who am I?

Asia Forest Species Slideshow 12Guess That Animal: Forest Edition © Doug Janson

Black-winged Starling—Critically Endangered. These birds were devastated by the caged-bird trade, and in recent years they’ve been pushed closer to extinction by agricultural conversion.

Asia Forest Species Slideshow 13Guess That Animal: Forest Edition © Bradley Buhro-Creative Commons

I am the Man of the Forest—one of humankind’s closest relatives. But deforestation and oil-palm plantations are diminishing my species rapidly. Who am I?

Asia Forest Species Slideshow 14Guess That Animal: Forest Edition © Bradley Buhro-Creative Commons

Bornean Orangutan—Endangered. Less than 55,000 of these magnificent creatures still survive—and reforming the way forestry works in Asia is key to keeping them around. How?

Asia Forest Species Slideshow 15Guess That Animal: Forest Edition © Mark Godfrey/TNC

Many of these species could be helped by adjusting the ways forests are managed in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea.

Asia Forest Species Slideshow 16Guess That Animal: Forest Edition © Ahmad Fuadi/TNC

By helping local people care for their forests in responsible ways, we can protect some of the world’s most threatened species—and you can help, too, by buying certified sustainable wood and paper products and by supporting our work.

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