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  • A total of 48 hirola were rounded up to establish the Ishaqbini community sanctuary, along with small groups of topi, kudu, gerenuk, oryx, giraffe, ostrich and buffalo.
  • The captured hirola were air-lifted and arrived at holding pens within 30 minutes of capture.
  • A veterinarian and a handler accompanied each pair of hirola during air transport.
  • Five people were needed to carry each hirola from helicopter to holding pen – a perfect way for the community elders to be involved and account for “their” hirola.
  • The author, Juliet King, is a key contributor to the Ishaqbini community’s efforts to establish a hirola sanctuary.
  • “The participation of Ishaqbini’s elders in the capture operation was invaluable, and their stories remain alive.”
  • "Safely removing predators from the sanctuary proved to be the most onerous task."
  • Three cheetah cubs were actually caught by hand!
  • A team of rangers now protects and monitors the hirola. Return to sanctuary story
Kenya
Hirola Sanctuary's Flying Start

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