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  • Boarding our plane in Vientiane to fly to Pakse in south of Laos.
  • Amazing view of Mekong as we made our approach into Pakse.
  • Dock area in Nakasang in southern Laos part of an area known as Si Phan Don, which in Lao means "four thousand islands." Here, the Mekong, which had been one single channel, breaks up into dozens of channels that wind their way through thousands of islands.
  • The channels of the Four Thousand Island region are busy with boats carrying people back and forth between different islands. There are few roads and fewer bridges in the region.
  • We journeyed over to Somphamit Falls, where a few of the bigger channels of the Mekong roar over rapids and waterfalls.
  • The Somphamit Falls is part of the series of falls and rapids that frustrated French plans of using the Mekong as the backdoor water route to trade with China.
  • One of Wren's creations made of found objects around the Falls. She called it a "floating humbug."
  • That night we stayed a foot above the river in our "floating bungalow" in Ban Khone on the island of Don Khone.
  • Paola on the floating bungalow where we had a perfect view of Ban Khone and the Mekong.
  • Susnset in Ban Khone. Breathtaking!
  • One night there was a tremendous hatch of flying insects from the river and they were flying around the lights of the riverside restaurant where we were eating. The second night, an ant colony had found the hatch and the ants were everywhere, capturing the insects and hauling them away.
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Mekong River Journey
Four Thousand Island

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