Start receiving our award-winning magazine today!

Subscribe

Places We Protect

Where We Work: Pacific Islands

The Pacific islands have experienced the disruption of their delicate ecosystems due to invasives.

The Pacific islands of Micronesia, Polynesia, Melanesia and Hawaii have all experienced the devastating impact of invasive species, disrupting delicate ecosystems and the communities which depend on the natural resources they provide.  Seabird populations have been threatened by invasive ants, snakes and rats. Agriculture has been affected by the introduction of new crop diseases and smothering weeds. Mosquitoes and African snails carry pathogens which can be harmful to both people and animals.  All aspects of island life have been impacted, from the economy to the environment.

The Nature Conservancy is supporting the Pacific Invasives Learning Network (PILN) which enables conservation professionals across the region to share knowledge and experience to prevent and contain the spread of invasive species.

The team in Pohnpei recently developed a comprehensive invasive species action plan.  Having shared their work with the PILN they inspired teams from Palau, Kiribati, Kosrae and the Marshall Islands to develop their own action plans.  By sharing skills and coordinating their response at both technical and policy levels, the Network aims to accelerate action to protect the precious lands and waters of the Pacific islands.

We’re Accountable

The Nature Conservancy makes careful use of your support.

More Ratings

x animal

Sign up for Nature eNews!

Sign Up for Nature e-News

Get our e-newsletter filled with eco-tips and info on the places you care about most.

Thank you for joining our online community!

We’ll be in touch soon with more Nature Conservancy news, updates and exciting stories.

Please leave this field empty

We respect your privacy. The Nature Conservancy will not sell, rent or exchange your e-mail address. Read our full privacy policy for more information. By submitting this form, you agree to the Nature.org terms of use.