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Forests

Montana: Meet Jeanette Nordahl

“The Southwestern Crown Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration program is a critical tool for us to maintain our way of life — and keep the weeds out — here in Lincoln. We’ve also been able to start paying local contractors to do the work." Jeanette Nordahl

Jeanette Nordahl has been recreating in Lincoln, Montana since 1972 when her family bought land and built a cabin in the area. She fondly recalls weekends, summers, and winter vacations spent hiking, fishing, and snowmobiling the Upper Blackfoot Valley.

Nordahl lives full-time in the Upper Blackfoot Valley community of Lincoln and is an active member of the Ponderosa Snow Warriors, a snowmobile club. The club, originally formed in 1967 and boasting over 250 members, began partnering with the U.S. Forest Service about 15 years ago to fight noxious weeds in the valley. Jeanette serves as the project manager for this weed eradication program.

“Weeds have been an ever increasing problem here. Based on the memories I have of this place in years past, I just can’t sit by and watch the weeds take over,” says Jeanette.

Besides being home to Jeanette, the area is also home to the Scapegoat Wilderness— the first citizen-initiated wilderness area in the country — and the world-famous Blackfoot River, which is an important area for elk, grizzly bears, lynx, and wolverine.

Jeanette is a strong supporter of the Southwestern Crown of the Continent work, and has been engaged in the effort to restore the forest since it started three years ago.

“The Southwestern Crown Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration program is a critical tool for us to maintain our way of life — and keep the weeds out — here in Lincoln. We’ve also been able to start paying local contractors to do the work,” she adds.

“I have seen first-hand the benefits to people, water, and wildlife the work this program is doing,” Jeanette continues. “We’ve been able to fight weeds on three times the ground we used to cover. Areas that used to be infested with weeds are now covered with native wildflowers.”

“It is my hope that we can make the valley weed free and engage the younger generation in the fight,” offers Jeanette. “I am thankful the Southwestern Crown of the Continent project is helping make this hope come true.”

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