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United by Nature

Conservation Traditions that Span the Generations

By Daniel White and James Miller

How did you learn to love nature? What made you care about conservation?

So often, the answers to these questions involve people from another generation — family members, mentors, friends — and the experience and knowledge they shared.

These days, the role of passing on love and knowledge of nature is perhaps more crucial than ever, and more challenging. That’s because the obstacles to sustaining and rejuvenating our collective commitment to conservation — increased urbanization, electronic overload and more — are abundant, real and documented.

Still, even along the densely populated East Coast of the United States, many places and families demonstrate that the conservation torch is still being passed from one generation to another. And it’s happening in some wonderful and sometimes surprising ways.

Travel with us from Florida ranches to Maine’s Penobscot River as we uncover some of these inspiring stories.



Florida: Ranching Tradition Endures

Connecticut: Teen Lives Farming Dream

Massachusetts: Berkshire Camp Renewed

Virginia: Family Grows Together

Ohio: Forest Values Evolve

Daniel White and James Miller

About the Authors
Daniel White is a Conservancy senior writer based in Charlottesville, Virginia; James Miller is a Conservancy media relations manager based in Boston, Massachusetts.
 

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