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Now & Then

A Photo History of Life in Nature

It’s been said that you can’t go home again: perhaps the grassy field where you played baseball has sprouted cul-de-sacs. Maybe the towering snow mountains where you steered your sled on Christmas afternoon have melted away to a soggy, green holiday season.

But sometimes, with your support, we’re able to bring nature back. Trees that volunteers planted in The Nature Conservancy's early years have grown into thriving forests. Bald eagles again skim over urban rivers that were literally ablaze in decades past.

How have the natural places that are special to you changed within your lifetime?

Preserving Nature on Film

Since the Conservancy’s photo archives are brimming with imagery of these beloved spaces, the best way to answer that question is through photography.

With your help, we're sharing our favorite historic nature photos from the past 60 years over at Historypin.com.

To view these photos or to add your historic photos to the collection, visit Historypin, and be sure to tag your photo with ‘Nature Conservancy’ so that we can include your memories in our photo collection of nature, now and then. Or download Historypin's mobile application to add modern images while you're out exploring.

See what I've pinned on Historypin

Historypin Highlights

These are some of our favorite photos:

Maine’s Penobscot River was once filled bank to bank with logs, bumping up against century-old dams; the river running green and brown with pollutants. Thanks to the Clean Water Act and an ongoing dam removal project, we’re celebrating a river reborn. 

Across the midwest, prairies that all but blew away during the Dust Bowl are thriving, as native birds sing from restored grasslands where bison are being reintroduced. In New Jersey, a stretch of the Cape May beach where an entire town once stood amid the dunes, has been restored to bird habitat after storm surges literally washed the town away.

What photo tells your nature story? Fishing with your mom? A first-date hike with your husband? The view from your grandma's front porch? Start sharing your memories.

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