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Road safety project receives donation from TransCanada

A safety project aimed at making highways safer for wildlife and humans recently received a boost.


Bonners Ferry, Idaho | 

BONNERS FERRY, IDAHO – A safety project aimed at making highways safer for wildlife and humans received a $5,000 donation from TransCanada on Monday, Jan. 27 at the Kootenai Valley Resource Initiative (KVRI) meeting in Bonners Ferry, Idaho.

The McArthur Lake Safety project is combining the use of Doppler radar, high-resolution thermal cameras and other wireless technologies to create a mobile wildlife detection system. The system is being used to prevent wildlife-vehicle collisions along an accident-prone stretch of US Highway 95 in Boundary County.

For several years The Nature Conservancy, as a partner of the Kootenai Valley Resource Initiative, has looked for ways to make the area safer. In December, after researching several safety options, the first phase of the project was deployed near Bonners Ferry.

“Safety is TransCanada’s highest priority for its employees, landowners, people, and wildlife in the communities where we operate,” said Steven McNulty, TransCanada Land Supervisor, Gas Transmission Northwest System. “We all share the same roads and are committed to the safety of our families and values we share to maintain the highest quality of life.”

The donation from TransCanada will provide matching funds for a $100,000 grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. TransCanada’s mission is to safely, responsibly and reliably transport energy used by millions of North Americans every day. The company is headquartered in Calgary but has a significant presence in the United States and a growing business in Mexico.

For the latest update on this project, visit our blog Idaho Nature Notes. For more information on TransCanada visit: www.transcanada.com, Twitter @TransCanada or http://blog.transcanada.com.
 


The Nature Conservancy is a leading conservation organization working around the world to protect ecologically important lands and waters for nature and people. The Conservancy and its more than 1 million members have protected nearly 120 million acres worldwide. Visit The Nature Conservancy on the Web at www.nature.org.

Contact information

Kennon McClintock
Watershed Manager, Bonners Ferry
208.267.8999
kmcclintock@tnc.org


Gretchen Krueger
Media Line
832.320.6849; 800.608.7859

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