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Black History Month Quiz

Test Your Conservation IQ

African Americans have a rich history in conservation that can be found everywhere from Motown to national parks.

Did you know that African American Buffalo Soldiers were some of the earliest defenders of our national parks? Or that the hit Motown song "Mercy, Mercy Me" was inspired by nature?

Take the quiz below to learn about African Americans who pioneered and advocated for conservation. Then see how today’s youth are following in their footsteps as part of The Nature Conservancy's Leaders in Environmental Action for the Future (LEAF) program. Get a millenial's perspective on African Americans and the environment from LEAF alumna Cleo Doley, who is pursuing a concentration in environmental justice at the University of Vermont.

Interested in learning even more about conservation heroes? Check out these six facts about African American leaders who made an impact for the environment and watch a video about a park ranger who is inspiring the next generation of African American conservationists.


 

  1. Which Motown singer penned the tune "Mercy, Mercy Me (the Ecology)," a song of sorrow about the environment?

    Diana Ross

    Diana Ross | Incorrect

    Smokey Robinson

    Smokey Robinson | Incorrect

    Gladys Knight

    Gladys Knight | Incorrect

    Marvin Gaye

    Marvin Gaye | Correct

  2. True or false: Known as the "planetwalker," African American environmentalist John Francis boycotted motorized vehicles for 22 years, opting to walk everywhere instead.

    True

    True | Correct

    False

    False | Incorrect

    | Incorrect

    | Incorrect

  3. True or false: The model for Community Supported Agriculture, or CSA, programs was inspired by chefs in New York City.

    True

    True | Incorrect

    False

    False | Correct

    | Incorrect

    | Incorrect

  4. True or false: In addition to civil rights and equality, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was passionate about environmental issues.

    True

    True | Correct

    False

    False | Incorrect

    | Incorrect

    | Incorrect

  5. True or false: George Washington Carver, famous for inventing hundreds of new uses for the peanut, was a fan of composting.

    True

    True | Correct

    False

    False | Incorrect

    | Incorrect

    | Incorrect

  6. True or false: Lisa Perez Jackson was named the first African American Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1995.

    True

    True | Incorrect

    False

    False | Correct

    | Incorrect

    | Incorrect

  7. Buffalo Soldiers in the U.S. Army were among the first park rangers in the American West. They are noted for:

    Protecting national parks including Yosemite and nearby Sequoia.

    Protecting national parks including Yosemite and nearby Sequoia. | Incorrect

    Helping to suppress forest fires and crack down on poachers.

    Helping to suppress forest fires and crack down on poachers. | Incorrect

    Completing the first usable road into Giant Forest, the heart of Sequoia National Park.

    Completing the first usable road into Giant Forest, the heart of Sequoia National Park. | Incorrect

    All of the Above

    All of the Above | Correct

  8. True or false: In addition to leading hundreds of slaves to freedom on the Underground Railroad, Harriet Tubman was also a nurse who looked to nature to find cures for major illnesses of her time.

    True

    True | Correct

    False

    False | Incorrect

    | Incorrect

    | Incorrect

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